Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms


Ingredients

  • 1 lb (16 oz) portabella mushroom caps
  • 2 cups shredded moderate-fat mozzarella cheese (3-6 g fat per oz)
  • ½ cup (1 medium 2-3/5”) fresh tomato, chopped
  • ½ tsp finely chopped fresh rosemary or 1/8 tsp dried rosemary
  • 2 tsp fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tsp fresh cilantro, chopped
  • 1 tsp low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tsp olive oil, divided
  • 1/8 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 clove garlic, minced

Direction

Preheat oven to 350°F or outdoor grill to medium-high heat. In a medium-sized bowl, combine chopped tomatoes and shredded mozzarella; toss with ½ tsp of olive oil, rosemary,  black pepper, and garlic. Remove stems from mushroom caps and discard. Using a spoon, scoop out interior of mushrooms to create “mushroom bowls.” In a small bowl, mix ½ tsp olive oil, lemon juice, and soy sauce. Using a pastry brush, brush soy sauce mixture on both sides of mushroom caps. In the oven: Bake mushroom caps in oven until soft, then divide tomato and cheese mixture into mushroom caps. Cook an additional 2 minutes, or until cheese is melted. On the grill: Once warm, grill mushroom caps, starting with stem-side down, 5 minutes on each side or until soft. Spoon ¼ of tomato and cheese mixture into each cap. Cover and grill about 2 minutes or until cheese has melted. (For easy cleanup, place a piece of aluminum foil directly on grill; lay mushroom caps on aluminum foil.) Garnish with cilantro. Each serving includes two mushrooms and ½ cheese and tomato mixture.

 

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Nutritional Information

Paprika Spiced Cauliflower Soup


INGREDIENTS

1/3 cup flour
½ tsp. kosher salt
6 tbsp. unsalted butter, cubed and chilled
1 egg
1 ½ tbsp. Hungarian hot paprika
1 large yellow onion, finely chopped
6 cups vegetable stock
1 small head cauliflower, large stem removed, cut into florets
1 medium carrot, peeled and finely chopped

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1 small bunch flat-leaf parsley, stemmed and finely chopped

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Make the dumplings: In a bowl, stir together flour and salt; add 2 tbsp. butter, and using your fingers, rub into flour until pea-size crumbles form. Add egg, and stir until dough forms; refrigerate until ready to use.

2. Heat remaining butter in a 6-qt. saucepan over medium-high heat; add paprika and onion, and cook, stirring, until soft, about 5 minutes. Add vegetable stock, cauliflower, and carrot; season with salt and pepper, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium, and cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are tender, about 15 minutes. Using a ½-tsp. measuring spoon, portion out and drop all dumpling dough into simmering soup; cook, stirring occasionally, until dumplings are cooked through, about 3 minutes.

3. To serve, ladle soup and dumplings into 4 serving bowls, and garnish with parsley.

Smoked Yogurt


INGREDIENTS

  • 1 qt. plain full-fat yogurt
  • 1 cup fine-grain oak or hickory wood chips
  • 1 tbsp. white miso
  • ½ tsp. fresh lemon juice
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

INSTRUCTIONS

Line the bottom of a roasting pan with ice. Spread plain full-fat yogurt in an 8″ x 8″ baking dish; nestle dish into ice. Place ½ cup fine-grain oak or hickory wood chips in a small metal bowl. Using a blowtorch, light chips, stirring as needed, until all the chips are charred; blow out any embers that remain and nestle bowl into ice. Cover roasting pan with aluminum foil; let sit 20 minutes. Discard wood chips and repeat smoking process with another ½ cup wood chips. Stir white miso, lemon juice, salt, and pepper into yogurt.

Garlicky Skillet Greens


INGREDIENTS

  • ¼ cup apple cider vinegar
  • ¼ cup sorghum
  • 2 tbsp. Sriracha hot sauce
  • 1 small yellow onion (½ roughly chopped, ½ minced)
  • ¼ cup rendered bacon fat
  • 1½ lb. each collard and turnip greens, stems discarded, leaves thinly sliced
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • 12 cloves garlic confit, sliced, plus 2 tbsp. garlic oil

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Boil vinegar, sorghum, and Sriracha in a 1-qt. saucepan; let gastrique cool.2. Melt bacon fat in a 12″ cast-iron skillet over medium-high. Stir in minced onion; cook until soft, 4–6 minutes. Increase heat to high, add both greens, and season with salt; cook, stirring constantly, until greens are wilted, 1–2 minutes. Stir in reserved gastrique, the garlic confit, and oil.

Broccoli and Italian Sausage Ravioli


INGREDIENTS

  • FOR THE DOUGH:
  • 8 oz. rigatoni
  • 1½ tsp. kosher salt
  • Olive oil, for greasing

  • FOR FILLING AND FRYING:
  • 3 tbsp. olive oil
  • 4 oz. hot or sweet Italian sausage, casing removed
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 8 oz. broccoli rabe, cut into ½” pieces
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • 3 tbsp. grated parmesan
  • 2 hot cherry peppers, seeded and minced
  • 10 slices deli-style mozzarella
  • Canola oil, for frying
  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 cup bread crumbs

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Make the dough: Bring 4 cups water to a boil in a 6-qt. saucepan. Add pasta and reduce heat to medium; cook, stirring occasionally, until pasta is very soft, about 20 minutes. Let pasta cool in water; drain completely and transfer to a food processor. Add salt and purée into a smooth, sticky dough. Divide dough between 2 sheets of greased parchment paper. Top each with another sheet of greased parchment paper and flatten; chill 30 minutes.

2. Make the filling: Heat 1 tbsp. oil in a 12″ skillet over medium-high. Cook sausage, stirring and breaking up into small pieces, until browned, 4–6 minutes. Transfer sausage to a colander set over a bowl; set aside. Add remaining oil to skillet. Cook garlic until golden, 1–2 minutes. Stir in broccoli rabe, salt, and ¼ cup water; boil. Reduce heat to medium; cook, covered, until broccoli rabe is tender, 6–8 minutes. Transfer to colander with sausage and let filling cool. Transfer filling to a bowl; stir in parmesan and peppers.

3. Assemble the ravioli: Working with half the dough and using a rolling pin, roll dough ⅙” thick. Remove top sheet of parchment paper; using a 4½” round cutter, cut out 10 circles, gathering and rerolling scraps. Place 1 slice mozzarella over each circle and top with 2 tbsp. filling. Fold circle in half and pinch edges to seal in filling.

4. Fry the ravioli: Heat 2″ canola oil in a 6-qt. saucepan until a deep-fry thermometer reads 350°. Place flour, eggs, and bread crumbs in separate shallow dishes. Working with 1 ravioli at a time, dredge in flour, dip in eggs, and coat in bread crumbs; fry until golden and crisp, 2–3 minutes. Transfer ravioli to paper towels to drain; serve hot.

The Ultimate Veggie Fried Rice


  • 2 Tbs. olive oil
  • 1 small onion, chopped (1 cup)
  • 1 small carrot, diced (¼ cup)
  • 1 stalk celery, diced (¼ cup)
  • 1 tsp. herbes de Provence
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 2 cups cooked brown rice, crumbled or broken up
  • 2 cups leftover vegetables, beans, etc., optional

1. Heat skillet over medium-high heat, and add oil. Sauté onion, carrot, celery, herbes de Provence, and salt 10 to 15 minutes, or until well browned. Add a little more oil if pan seems dry. Add cooked rice, and stir-fry 5 minutes, or until mixture is hot and well combined.

Per 1-cup serving:

  • Calories: 189
  • Protein: 3 g
  • Total Fat: 8 g
  • Saturated Fat: 1 g
  • Carbohydrates: 27 g
  • Cholesterol: 0 mg
  • Sodium: 308 mg
  • Fiber: 3 g
  • Sugar: 3 g

Spinach Pasta


The Truth Behind Pasta


Pasta is a global favorite, but not all pasta is alike. Whole-grain pasta has a chewier texture than regular pasta, but it’s also more nutrient-rich. Whole-grain pasta wins out over regular pasta every time as your healthiest choice. If you’re having trouble making the switch to whole-grain pasta, start with a half-and-half blend of the two pastas and increase the percentage of whole-grain pasta each time you cook it.

Milled vs. Unmilled

All grains are whole before they are milled or refined. Whole grains contain an inner layer called the germ, a middle layer called the endosperm and an outer layer of bran. When whole grains go through the milling or refining process, the nutritious bran and germ are removed, leaving only the starchy endosperm, which is what regular white pasta is made from. Check the ingredients list on the pasta food label to ensure the words “whole grain,” “whole wheat” or another whole grain is listed as the predominant ingredient.

Fiber Content

Whole-grain pasta beats regular pasta when it comes to fiber content. A 1-cup serving of cooked whole-grain pasta contains 3.9 total grams of fiber, while the same amount of white pasta contains 2.3 grams. Fiber is the part of a plant food that your body can’t digest. It is crucial to a healthy diet because it helps move food waste through your digestive tract, reducing constipation. It helps lower blood pressure and also helps keep your body’s blood sugar levels stable.

Nutrient Content

Regular pasta may be fortified with iron and other nutrients, which means that certain nutrients like B vitamins and folate that were removed during the refining process are added back into the pasta. While the carbohydrate and fat content of both pastas is similar, whole-wheat pasta provides the most protein, and the calcium content for whole-wheat pasta is double that of regular. While a 2-ounce serving of regular pasta contains 108 milligrams of phosphorus and 30 milligrams of magnesium, its whole-wheat counterpart contains 147 milligrams of phosphorus and 82 milligrams of magnesium. Phosphorus helps build and protect your bones and teeth. Magnesium is crucial for many chemical reactions in your body.

Resistant Starch Effects

When certain starch-rich foods, such as pasta, are cooked and then cooled, their starch changes form, making it more resistant to digestion. Resistant starch, which is a form of fiber, helps maintain good colon health and low blood cholesterol levels. To get the most benefits from nutrients and resistant starch, it’s best to choose whole-grain pasta instead of pasta made from refined white flour. A cold pasta salad makes an excellent resistant-starch choice.

Glycemic Index Rankings

While the glycemic index, which refers to the effect food has on your body’s blood sugar levels, ranks both regular pasta and whole-wheat pasta in the low range — under 50 — the whole-wheat variety still comes out the winner with a GI of 37 compared to regular pasta with a GI of 41. Overcooking your pasta swells and gelatinizes its starch grains, making them more available for digestive enzymes. This increases the food’s GI. Serve your pasta al dente — firm to the bite — so that it is digested more slowly, so about 7 mins.

Banana Pudding….


Coconut milk beverage adds a hint of sweet flavor to this classic dessert.
  • ⅓ cup sugar
  • 4 Tbs. cornstarch
  • ⅛ tsp. salt
  • 3 cups (coconut) milk beverage, such as Silk, divided
  • 1 ½ tsp. vanilla extract
  • 3 very ripe bananas, sliced
  • 48 (vegan) vanilla wafer cookies
  • (Nondairy) whipped topping for garnish, optional

1. Place sugar, cornstarch, and salt in saucepan, and gradually whisk in coconut milk. Bring mixture to a boil over medium-low heat. Cook 5 minutes, or until thickened, whisking constantly. Stir in vanilla, then banana slices.

2. Line bottom of 11- x 7-inch baking dish with 24 cookies. Spread hot pudding over top, making sure bananas are submerged to prevent browning. Top with remaining 24 cookies, cover with plastic wrap, and cool. Refrigerate until cold. Top with whipped topping (if using).

Eggplant Curry


This  version of Thai curry is made with “lite” coconut milk, which has the same flavor but one-third the calories and one-third the fat than regular coconut milk. For a milder taste, substitute green or yellow Thai curry paste for the red, or reduce the amount of red curry paste to 1 tablespoon. This curry is excellent on its own or spooned over basmati rice.
  • 2 Tbs. packed dark brown sugar
  • 1 Tbs. rice vinegar
  • 1 Tbs. tamari or soy sauce
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 10-oz. pkg. frozen peas
  • 1 medium red bell pepper, cut into thin strips
  • 12-oz. pkg. extra-firm tofu
  • 2 (14-oz.) cans lite coconut milk
  • 2 Tbs. red Thai curry paste
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 medium eggplant (1 ½ lbs.), cut into 1-inch cubes
  1. Wrap tofu in several layers of paper towels. Place in colander in sink. Set plate on top of wrapped tofu, then weigh down with large, heavy can (such as a can of tomatoes). Let stand at least 20 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, shake cans of coconut milk well, then open. Pour 1/2 of 1 can into large saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Whisk in curry paste until well blended. Add onion, eggplant and bell pepper, stirring well with rubber spatula (to prevent breaking tender eggplant during cooking) and scraping bottom of pan.
  3. Add remaining 1 1/2 cans coconut milk, sugar, vinegar, tamari and salt, stirring with spatula to mix well. Increase heat to high and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer, stirring occasionally, 20 minutes.
  4. Unwrap tofu and cut into bite-size cubes. Add to curry mixture, stirring with spatula to mix. Cook until heated through, about 5 minutes. Add peas and warm through, 1 to 2 minutes. Serve hot.