Crockpot Beef


Ingredients

  • 2-½ lbs (40 oz) raw, boneless beef chuck clod roast (should yield six 5-oz cooked servings)

Crockpot spice blend:

  • 2 Tbsp water
  • 1 Tbsp black pepper
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 4 tsp balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tsp dry mustard
  • ½ tsp salt or salt substitute
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced

Vegetables:

  • 6 cups (1-¼ lbs) whole mushrooms, trimmed
  • 3 cups (7-8 large stalks) celery, roughly diced
  • 3 cups green beans, trimmed
  • 2 cups scallions (12-14 scallions), roughly chopped

Direction

Trim all visible fat from roast. Rub black pepper and garlic onto roast; place in crock pot. Make several small shallow slits in top of roast. In small bowl, combine remaining spice blend ingredients; pour over meat. Cover; cook on low 8-10 hours or on high 4-5 hours. Add vegetables during last 30-60 minutes of roasting. Recipe should serve six 5-oz servings of roast and 3 vegetable servings each.

 

Nutritional Information

30 day Challenge

Grilled Steak and Vegetable Salad


Ingredients

  • 14 oz raw top sirloin steak (should yield two 5-oz cooked servings)
  • 2 cups lettuce or mixed salad greens
  • 1 cup (1 medium-large 3” x 2-¾”) yellow pepper, sliced lengthwise
  • 1 cup (2 small 2-2/5”) tomatoes, wedged or sliced
  • 3 Tbsp Newman’s Own® Lighten Up Balsamic Vinaigrette Dressing
  • 2 Tbsp red onion, chopped

Direction

Preheat grill to medium-high heat. Trim all visible fat from meat. Brush 1-½ Tbsp dressing lightly over one side of steak and over cut sides of peppers. Reserve remaining 1-½ Tbsp for later use. Place steak and peppers on grill, dressing sides down. Grill steak 5 minutes on each side or until medium doneness (160° F) and grill peppers 10 minutes (peppers do not need turning) or until al dente (tender-crisp). Meanwhile, place greens in 2 serving bowls; top with tomatoes and onions. Cut steak across the grain into thin slices; cut peppers. Arrange steak and peppers over salads. Drizzle with remaining 1-½ Tbsp dressing.

 

Nutritional Information

30 day challenge

Lemon Garlic Lamb


Ingredients

  • ¾ lb (12 oz) raw, boneless lamb chop loin* (should yield two 5-oz cooked servings)
  • 6 cups (1 large bunch) fresh spinach
  • 2 cups portabella mushrooms (3 medium mushroom cups)
  • 1 cup (8 medium) cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 4 tsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tsp dried rosemary
  • ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • Non-stick cooking spray
  • Dash of salt and/or pepper (optional)

*This recipe can also be made with chicken breast: start with 1 lb raw, boneless, skinless chicken breast to yield two 6-oz cooked servings.

Direction

Lamb: Preheat broiler. Trim all visible fat from lamb. Spray rack in broiler pan with non-stick cooking spray for 3 seconds. In a small bowl, combine garlic, dried rosemary, and black pepper. Place lamb on prepared rack and cover with half of garlic mixture. Broil 4 minutes, 4 inches from heat; turn lamb over. Cover lamb with remaining garlic mixture. Broil 2-4 minutes or until cooked through. Vegetables: Spray medium skillet with non-stick cooking spray for 2 seconds and heat over medium heat. Add mushrooms and sauté. Once mushrooms are near desired tenderness, add spinach and tomatoes and sauté an additional 2-3 minutes. Serve lamb over vegetables. Salt and pepper to taste if desired.

 

Nutritional Information

My 30 day Challenge

Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms


Ingredients

  • 1 lb (16 oz) portabella mushroom caps
  • 2 cups shredded moderate-fat mozzarella cheese (3-6 g fat per oz)
  • ½ cup (1 medium 2-3/5”) fresh tomato, chopped
  • ½ tsp finely chopped fresh rosemary or 1/8 tsp dried rosemary
  • 2 tsp fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tsp fresh cilantro, chopped
  • 1 tsp low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tsp olive oil, divided
  • 1/8 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 clove garlic, minced

Direction

Preheat oven to 350°F or outdoor grill to medium-high heat. In a medium-sized bowl, combine chopped tomatoes and shredded mozzarella; toss with ½ tsp of olive oil, rosemary,  black pepper, and garlic. Remove stems from mushroom caps and discard. Using a spoon, scoop out interior of mushrooms to create “mushroom bowls.” In a small bowl, mix ½ tsp olive oil, lemon juice, and soy sauce. Using a pastry brush, brush soy sauce mixture on both sides of mushroom caps. In the oven: Bake mushroom caps in oven until soft, then divide tomato and cheese mixture into mushroom caps. Cook an additional 2 minutes, or until cheese is melted. On the grill: Once warm, grill mushroom caps, starting with stem-side down, 5 minutes on each side or until soft. Spoon ¼ of tomato and cheese mixture into each cap. Cover and grill about 2 minutes or until cheese has melted. (For easy cleanup, place a piece of aluminum foil directly on grill; lay mushroom caps on aluminum foil.) Garnish with cilantro. Each serving includes two mushrooms and ½ cheese and tomato mixture.

 

My 30 day Challenge

Nutritional Information

Spicy Garlic and Lime Shrimp


Ingredients

  • 1-¾ pound (28 oz) large raw shrimp, peeled and de-veined (leave tails on); if using frozen, fully cooked shrimp use 1-1/3 lbs (about 21 oz) (either starting portion should yield three 7-oz servings)
  • 3 8-oz packages of House Tofu Shirataki brand angel hair noodles
  • 1 cup (2 small 2-2/5”) fresh or canned tomatoes, diced (if using canned tomatoes, drain liquid)
  • ½ cup (1 small 2-½” x 2”) green peppers, chopped
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp lime juice
  • 1 clove garlic, pressed

Seasoning blend:

  • ¼ tsp salt or salt substitute
  • ¼ tsp ground black pepper
  • ¼ tsp cayenne pepper
  • ¼ tsp dried parsley flakes
  • ¼ tsp garlic powder
  • ¼ tsp paprika
  • 1/8 tsp dried thyme
  • 1/8 tsp onion powder

Direction

If using frozen shrimp, thaw. De-vein and peel shrimp. Make the seasoning blend by combining all the spices in a small bowl. Drain liquid from noodles and rinse thoroughly, set aside. Preheat a large skillet over medium heat. Once pan is heated, add olive oil and stir in pressed garlic. Immediately add shrimp, green bell peppers, and lime juice. Sprinkle the entire seasoning blend over shrimp and peppers. Stir. Sauté shrimp and peppers 3-6 minutes. Add drained noodles and continue to cook shrimp, peppers, and noodles an additional 2-4 minutes or until shrimp begins to brown and peppers are al dente (tender-crisp). Remove from heat, toss with tomatoes.

Nutritional Information

The Health Program

Zesty Lemon Scallion Grilled Chicken & Vegetable Kabobs


Today officially starts prep for my 30 day challenge.  So for the next 30 days, I will be posting recipes from that.  All these recipes are lean and healthy.  If you are interested in loosing weight and getting healthy,  join me on my 30 day challenge.

Ingredients

  • 24 oz raw, boneless, skinless chicken breast (should yield three 6-oz cooked servings)
  • 2 cups (2 small) summer squash, halved lengthwise and cut into 1” chunks
  • 2 cups (18 medium) mushrooms, quartered
  • 1-½ cups (1 small-medium) zucchini, halved lengthwise and cut into 1” chunks
  • 1 cup (8 medium) cherry tomatoes

Zesty Lemon Scallion Sauce:

  • ¾ cup scallions (4-6 scallions), chopped
  • 6 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp hot red pepper sauce
  • ½ tsp salt or salt substitute
  • ¼ tsp black pepper, freshly ground

Direction

If using wooden skewers, soak in water 30 minutes. In small bowl, combine scallions, lemon juice, olive oil, hot red pepper sauce, salt, and black pepper; set aside. (You may wish to reserve part of this sauce for finished kabobs.) Preheat grill to medium heat. Thread kabobs with chicken, zucchini, squash, mushrooms, and tomatoes. Brush kabobs before and during cooking with sauce. Grill kabobs 10 minutes, turning once, until cooked through.

 

Nutritional information

Paprika Spiced Cauliflower Soup


INGREDIENTS

1/3 cup flour
½ tsp. kosher salt
6 tbsp. unsalted butter, cubed and chilled
1 egg
1 ½ tbsp. Hungarian hot paprika
1 large yellow onion, finely chopped
6 cups vegetable stock
1 small head cauliflower, large stem removed, cut into florets
1 medium carrot, peeled and finely chopped

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1 small bunch flat-leaf parsley, stemmed and finely chopped

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Make the dumplings: In a bowl, stir together flour and salt; add 2 tbsp. butter, and using your fingers, rub into flour until pea-size crumbles form. Add egg, and stir until dough forms; refrigerate until ready to use.

2. Heat remaining butter in a 6-qt. saucepan over medium-high heat; add paprika and onion, and cook, stirring, until soft, about 5 minutes. Add vegetable stock, cauliflower, and carrot; season with salt and pepper, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium, and cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are tender, about 15 minutes. Using a ½-tsp. measuring spoon, portion out and drop all dumpling dough into simmering soup; cook, stirring occasionally, until dumplings are cooked through, about 3 minutes.

3. To serve, ladle soup and dumplings into 4 serving bowls, and garnish with parsley.

The Fungus Among Us


Commonly considered a vegetable, mushrooms are actually a fungus, and they are delicious and nutritious. Often added to a salad or served as a side dish, mushrooms are rarely acknowledged as a source of many health-promoting nutrients, including vitamins and minerals, which have been linked to decreased risk of chronic diseases.

Nutritional Information

Each variety of mushroom will have a slightly different caloric count, but if you eat one cup of raw, white mushrooms, you will consume 15 calories. This serving size contains 0.5 grams of fiber and just over 1 gram of carbohydrates. With this serving, you will also have 1 gram of protein.

Vitamins

Crimini mushrooms are high in many vitamins, including riboflavin, niacin and vitamin B-5,  a vitamin essential for metabolism. They are very good sources of other B vitamins, including B-1 and B-6, and a good source of folic acid, which is involved in the proper function of red blood cells and in the synthesis of DNA. Mushrooms varieties such as portobello and crimini contain antioxidants, helping to slow down the aging and destruction of cells within the body. Vitamins also provide a source of vitamin D, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Minerals

Mushrooms are an excellent source of many minerals, including selenium, a powerful antioxidant, in addition to potassium and phosphorous. One 5 oz serving provides 35 percent of the daily value of copper. They are a very good source of manganese and zinc, which regulates nerve impulses and hormone release, and a good source of calcium and iron.

Varieties

Many varieties of mushrooms are available at your local market, including crimini mushrooms, which are similar in appearance to white button mushrooms, but with a darker coffee color, deeper flavor and greater nutrient density. Portobello mushrooms are large and meaty, making them suited to be served as entrees. Porcini mushrooms have a long, fleshy stalk and pores on the underside of their cap, while oyster mushrooms have a tender, velvety texture.

Serving Suggestions

Mushrooms are tasty sliced and added to salads, or as a companion to carrots and celery next to your favorite dip. Since important nutrients can be destroyed or diminished by overcooking mushrooms, it is healthiest to saute them for a few minutes. Use veggie broth instead of oil and try them with garlic or onions.

Shallots


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Shallots have been grown for almost as long as onions, and are the final “bulb vegetable.” Shallots were originally named scallions after Ascalon in Israel, the place from where the Greeks thought the vegetable originated, but shallots probably originally came from Central Asia.

Shallots are widely used in cooking, especially in Europe, specifically France, where small onions are preferred. Although they lack the strong smell of onions and do not make your eyes water, the taste is often more intense yet sweeter than that of onions, and they are used where delicate flavors are needed. The leaves are sometimes used as a substitute for chives, and in rural areas (in Europe) shallots are often used as a substitute for pickling onions.

Shallots are a small form of onion, but instead of growing as single bulbs they tend to grow in clusters. The shapes and colors of shallots vary considerably, and France in particular has a great number of varietals. Some are torpedo-shaped, others are rounded. The color varies from yellow through brown and even red, and the flavors range from delicate to intense.

Nutritional highlights…

A 100-gram serving, which is 3.5-ounces, of raw shallots contains only 72 calories, 0.10 grams of total fat, which includes only 0.017 grams of saturated fat. Each serving also offers the benefit of 3.2 grams of fiber, which is approximately 13 percent of the daily value set by the FDA, 2.5 grams of protein and 16.80 grams of carbohydrate.

Shallots contain 34 micrograms of folate, which is just shy of 10 percent of the DV. Folate, also known as folic acid, is one of eight B vitamins. It is essential for brain function and contributes to mental and emotional health. Folate also plays a role in cell development and in the production of your body’s DNA and RNA. It protects against brain and spine birth defects when taken early in pregnancy.

Shallots also contain the healthful mineral potassium, which supports many of your body’s functions. Each 3.5-ounce serving of raw shallots contains 334 milligrams of potassium, which is 10 percent of the daily values set by the FDA. Potassium helps your body maintain a steady heartbeat and fluid balance. It plays an important role in activation enzymes in carbohydrate and protein metabolism. It’s also essential to proper nerve cell firing, muscle contraction and kidney function.

Spring Onions


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Spring Onions, also known as scallions, are small onions that are eaten fresh. They originate from the same part of the world as their cousin, Central Asia. They are called spring onions because they are (usually) ready to eat in spring. Other members of the onion family do not mature until later in the year.

Spring onions can be used in cooking but they are more frequently eaten raw, especially in salads. The leaves can be used as a substitute for chives, and the onions themselves are often used as a garnish.

Go for spring onions with firm, unblemished bulbs and bright green perky leaves. Avoid those that are slimy or wilting. The skin covering a spring onion’ bulb can be either white or deep red fading to white at the roots – there’s no significant difference in taste. Similarly, the bulb can be quite pronounced or more like a leek in shape, with no noticeable swelling; again, this has no impact on flavour.

Nutritional Highlights…

There are 16 calories in 2 large Scallions or Spring Onions.
Calorie breakdown: 5% fat, 82% carbs, 13% protein.