Grilled Steak and Vegetable Salad


Ingredients

  • 14 oz raw top sirloin steak (should yield two 5-oz cooked servings)
  • 2 cups lettuce or mixed salad greens
  • 1 cup (1 medium-large 3” x 2-¾”) yellow pepper, sliced lengthwise
  • 1 cup (2 small 2-2/5”) tomatoes, wedged or sliced
  • 3 Tbsp Newman’s Own® Lighten Up Balsamic Vinaigrette Dressing
  • 2 Tbsp red onion, chopped

Direction

Preheat grill to medium-high heat. Trim all visible fat from meat. Brush 1-½ Tbsp dressing lightly over one side of steak and over cut sides of peppers. Reserve remaining 1-½ Tbsp for later use. Place steak and peppers on grill, dressing sides down. Grill steak 5 minutes on each side or until medium doneness (160° F) and grill peppers 10 minutes (peppers do not need turning) or until al dente (tender-crisp). Meanwhile, place greens in 2 serving bowls; top with tomatoes and onions. Cut steak across the grain into thin slices; cut peppers. Arrange steak and peppers over salads. Drizzle with remaining 1-½ Tbsp dressing.

 

Nutritional Information

30 day challenge

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Spicy Garlic and Lime Shrimp


Ingredients

  • 1-¾ pound (28 oz) large raw shrimp, peeled and de-veined (leave tails on); if using frozen, fully cooked shrimp use 1-1/3 lbs (about 21 oz) (either starting portion should yield three 7-oz servings)
  • 3 8-oz packages of House Tofu Shirataki brand angel hair noodles
  • 1 cup (2 small 2-2/5”) fresh or canned tomatoes, diced (if using canned tomatoes, drain liquid)
  • ½ cup (1 small 2-½” x 2”) green peppers, chopped
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp lime juice
  • 1 clove garlic, pressed

Seasoning blend:

  • ¼ tsp salt or salt substitute
  • ¼ tsp ground black pepper
  • ¼ tsp cayenne pepper
  • ¼ tsp dried parsley flakes
  • ¼ tsp garlic powder
  • ¼ tsp paprika
  • 1/8 tsp dried thyme
  • 1/8 tsp onion powder

Direction

If using frozen shrimp, thaw. De-vein and peel shrimp. Make the seasoning blend by combining all the spices in a small bowl. Drain liquid from noodles and rinse thoroughly, set aside. Preheat a large skillet over medium heat. Once pan is heated, add olive oil and stir in pressed garlic. Immediately add shrimp, green bell peppers, and lime juice. Sprinkle the entire seasoning blend over shrimp and peppers. Stir. Sauté shrimp and peppers 3-6 minutes. Add drained noodles and continue to cook shrimp, peppers, and noodles an additional 2-4 minutes or until shrimp begins to brown and peppers are al dente (tender-crisp). Remove from heat, toss with tomatoes.

Nutritional Information

The Health Program

Zesty Lemon Scallion Grilled Chicken & Vegetable Kabobs


Today officially starts prep for my 30 day challenge.  So for the next 30 days, I will be posting recipes from that.  All these recipes are lean and healthy.  If you are interested in loosing weight and getting healthy,  join me on my 30 day challenge.

Ingredients

  • 24 oz raw, boneless, skinless chicken breast (should yield three 6-oz cooked servings)
  • 2 cups (2 small) summer squash, halved lengthwise and cut into 1” chunks
  • 2 cups (18 medium) mushrooms, quartered
  • 1-½ cups (1 small-medium) zucchini, halved lengthwise and cut into 1” chunks
  • 1 cup (8 medium) cherry tomatoes

Zesty Lemon Scallion Sauce:

  • ¾ cup scallions (4-6 scallions), chopped
  • 6 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp hot red pepper sauce
  • ½ tsp salt or salt substitute
  • ¼ tsp black pepper, freshly ground

Direction

If using wooden skewers, soak in water 30 minutes. In small bowl, combine scallions, lemon juice, olive oil, hot red pepper sauce, salt, and black pepper; set aside. (You may wish to reserve part of this sauce for finished kabobs.) Preheat grill to medium heat. Thread kabobs with chicken, zucchini, squash, mushrooms, and tomatoes. Brush kabobs before and during cooking with sauce. Grill kabobs 10 minutes, turning once, until cooked through.

 

Nutritional information

Smoked Yogurt


INGREDIENTS

  • 1 qt. plain full-fat yogurt
  • 1 cup fine-grain oak or hickory wood chips
  • 1 tbsp. white miso
  • ½ tsp. fresh lemon juice
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

INSTRUCTIONS

Line the bottom of a roasting pan with ice. Spread plain full-fat yogurt in an 8″ x 8″ baking dish; nestle dish into ice. Place ½ cup fine-grain oak or hickory wood chips in a small metal bowl. Using a blowtorch, light chips, stirring as needed, until all the chips are charred; blow out any embers that remain and nestle bowl into ice. Cover roasting pan with aluminum foil; let sit 20 minutes. Discard wood chips and repeat smoking process with another ½ cup wood chips. Stir white miso, lemon juice, salt, and pepper into yogurt.

The Ultimate Veggie Fried Rice


  • 2 Tbs. olive oil
  • 1 small onion, chopped (1 cup)
  • 1 small carrot, diced (¼ cup)
  • 1 stalk celery, diced (¼ cup)
  • 1 tsp. herbes de Provence
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 2 cups cooked brown rice, crumbled or broken up
  • 2 cups leftover vegetables, beans, etc., optional

1. Heat skillet over medium-high heat, and add oil. Sauté onion, carrot, celery, herbes de Provence, and salt 10 to 15 minutes, or until well browned. Add a little more oil if pan seems dry. Add cooked rice, and stir-fry 5 minutes, or until mixture is hot and well combined.

Per 1-cup serving:

  • Calories: 189
  • Protein: 3 g
  • Total Fat: 8 g
  • Saturated Fat: 1 g
  • Carbohydrates: 27 g
  • Cholesterol: 0 mg
  • Sodium: 308 mg
  • Fiber: 3 g
  • Sugar: 3 g

Squash instead of Pasta??


The fibrous flesh of spaghetti squash resembles long noodles after cooking and shredding. Although the squash noodles differ in flavor from traditional flour-based pasta noodles, you can use them in much the same way as pasta. The squash has a mild, nutty flavor that complements lighter pasta sauces, making it a healthful low-carbohydrate replacement for spaghetti in your favorite dishes. Use the squash as the focal point of a light meal or as pasta-like side dish.

Step 1

Cut a washed spaghetti squash in half lengthwise. Scoop the seeds out of the center.

Step 2

Lay the squash cut side down on a baking sheet. Poke the rind all over with the tines of a fork. Bake in a preheated 350 degree Fahrenheit oven for 45 to 60 minutes, or until the flesh is tender enough to pierce with a fork.

Step 3

Flip the cooled squash halves over to reveal the flesh. Scrape a fork down the length of each squash half, separating the spaghetti-like strands from the rind.

Step 4

Toss the squash strands in a tomato-based pasta sauce to create a meal similar to spaghetti. Alternatively, coat the strands in melted butter with a sprinkling of Parmesan cheese and crushed pepper. Most pasta sauces, except heavy cream sauces, complement the squash noodles well.

Sweet and Sour Chicken


INGREDIENTS

1 tbsp. kosher salt
1 tbsp. sugar
1 tbsp. cornstarch
1 tbsp. white wine vinegar
3 cups canola oil
2 medium russet potatoes, cut diagonally into 1″ chunks
4 boneless, skinless chicken thighs, each quartered
¼ cup Asian chile paste
2 tbsp. minced jalapeño or serrano chiles
9 oz. thinly sliced green papaya
6 ribs celery, cut into 2″ pieces
1 4″ piece ginger, unpeeled and cut into ⅛″-thick slices
¼ cup Asian chile oil

Cilantro leaves, to garnish

INSTRUCTIONS

Stir together salt, sugar, cornstarch, vinegar, and 1 cup water in a small bowl; set slurry aside. Heat canola oil in a 14″ flat-bottomed wok or high-sided skillet over high heat. Add potatoes; fry, tossing, until browned, about 8 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer potatoes to a paper towel-lined plate to drain. Add chicken pieces to oil; fry, tossing, until browned, about 4 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer chicken to a plate; discard all but ½ cup oil, and return wok to heat. Add chile paste and minced chiles; cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add chicken, papaya, celery, and ginger; cook for 1 minute. Add slurry; cook, stirring constantly, until sauce thickens and chicken is cooked through, about 4 minutes. Add potatoes and chile oil; cook until potatoes are tender, about 2 minutes. Garnish with cilantro before serving.

Twice Baked Potato Bites


Ingredients

  • 2 lbs. red new potatoes (about 14), halved
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • coarse salt and ground pepper
  • 3/4 cup (vegan) chive and garlic cream cheese
  • 1/4 cup snipped fresh chives, plus more for garnish  

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 450° F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil or parchment. Cut a thin slice off the bottom of each potato half so they rest flat. In a large bowl, toss potatoes with oil; season with salt and pepper, and arrange bottom side down. Bake until tender, 30 to 35 minutes. Let cool on sheet.
  2. When the potatoes are cool enough, scoop out about a teaspoon from the center of each potato into a medium bowl. Add cream cheese and chives, and mash; season with salt and pepper. Stuff potatoes with filling. (To store, refrigerate stuffed potatoes on a rimmed baking sheet, up to 1 day.)
  3. Bake potatoes at 450 degrees until lightly browned, about 15 minutes. Garnish with chives.

The Fungus Among Us


Commonly considered a vegetable, mushrooms are actually a fungus, and they are delicious and nutritious. Often added to a salad or served as a side dish, mushrooms are rarely acknowledged as a source of many health-promoting nutrients, including vitamins and minerals, which have been linked to decreased risk of chronic diseases.

Nutritional Information

Each variety of mushroom will have a slightly different caloric count, but if you eat one cup of raw, white mushrooms, you will consume 15 calories. This serving size contains 0.5 grams of fiber and just over 1 gram of carbohydrates. With this serving, you will also have 1 gram of protein.

Vitamins

Crimini mushrooms are high in many vitamins, including riboflavin, niacin and vitamin B-5,  a vitamin essential for metabolism. They are very good sources of other B vitamins, including B-1 and B-6, and a good source of folic acid, which is involved in the proper function of red blood cells and in the synthesis of DNA. Mushrooms varieties such as portobello and crimini contain antioxidants, helping to slow down the aging and destruction of cells within the body. Vitamins also provide a source of vitamin D, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Minerals

Mushrooms are an excellent source of many minerals, including selenium, a powerful antioxidant, in addition to potassium and phosphorous. One 5 oz serving provides 35 percent of the daily value of copper. They are a very good source of manganese and zinc, which regulates nerve impulses and hormone release, and a good source of calcium and iron.

Varieties

Many varieties of mushrooms are available at your local market, including crimini mushrooms, which are similar in appearance to white button mushrooms, but with a darker coffee color, deeper flavor and greater nutrient density. Portobello mushrooms are large and meaty, making them suited to be served as entrees. Porcini mushrooms have a long, fleshy stalk and pores on the underside of their cap, while oyster mushrooms have a tender, velvety texture.

Serving Suggestions

Mushrooms are tasty sliced and added to salads, or as a companion to carrots and celery next to your favorite dip. Since important nutrients can be destroyed or diminished by overcooking mushrooms, it is healthiest to saute them for a few minutes. Use veggie broth instead of oil and try them with garlic or onions.

The Good, the Bad, the Ugly…. the Banana


Americans like their bananas, eating more than 10 pounds per person a year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Like other fruits, bananas make a healthy addition to your diet. They are a good source of energy and contain nutrients that keep your body healthy.  Bananas are packed with benefits for your body, and they make a convenient snack for any time of day. Bananas may even be good for your brain and help prevent chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. They benefit athletes, too, since they can help prevent muscle cramps

Nutritional Highlights…

One medium-sized banana contains 110 calories. Bananas are naturally free of fat, cholesterol and sodium. Each banana holds about 3 grams of fiber, which is 12 percent of your daily requirement. Bananas contain the minerals potassium and manganese. They also contain B vitamins, including folate, riboflavin and niacin. They’re a particularly good source of vitamin B-6, which helps produce antibodies and hemoglobin while maintaining healthy nerve function and blood glucose levels. One medium banana contains 15 percent of your daily requirement of vitamin C. Potassium is required for healthy functioning of your nervous system and muscles. If you’re deficient in potassium, your muscles can get tired and weak, and you may experience painful cramps.

Medicial Highlights…

In a study published in the “Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture” in 2014, scientists investigated the effect of bananas on glucose levels. In an animal study, they induced diabetes — a condition of glucose levels being too high — and then gave the rats banana extract. They concluded the banana extract hindered carbohydrate absorption, which has an anti-diabetic effect. But the effects of eating bananas on diabetes in humans hasn’t been examined. In another study on rats, published in the “Journal of Dietary Supplements” in 2009, scientists found that banana flavonoids lowered levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, phospholipids and fatty acids. This effect hasn’t been tested in humans.